Thursday, April 7, 2016

Switching to LEDs

Power Minister Piyush Goyal had repeatedly emphasized that the country would save 100 billion units of electricity a year by switching over to LED, which, he said, translated to a saving of Rs.40,000 crore across all households.
Switching to LEDs also helps the government meet its carbon dioxide emission reduction targets, since lower power consumption will eventually result in lower power production and hydrocarbon use .
According to the website of the Domestic Efficient Lighting Programme (DELP), the government has sold 9.17 crore LED bulbs as of April 6, the utilisation of which would result in a reduction of 26,451 tonnes of carbon dioxide per day, or almost 10 million tonnes a year. To put it in perspective, 10 million tonnes of CO2 is equivalent to nearly 54 million railcar worth of coal burned.
Under the Street Light National Programme, the government has converted 7,50,780 streetlights to LED, which, according to the programme website, has resulted in a saving of more than 2.72 lakh units of electricity per day.
And, the new line of fans will only add to this environmentally-friendly endeavour.
“The cooling needs of most of the households in India are met by fans, given that the penetration of ACs in households is still less than 10 per cent,” EESL (Energy Efficiency Services - a government-run joint venture.) stated in a release, following the announcement of its line of energy efficient fans. “The average rating of the fans installed and sold in the market is between 75-80 W, whereas energy efficient fans provide the same level of comfort at about 45-50 W.”
“There are 35 crore inefficient fans across the country. If all of these are replaced with BEE 5-star rated energy efficient fans, the country will have an expected annual energy savings of 47 billion KWh with a reduction of over 12,250 MW of electricity load,” EESL added.

No comments:

Post a Comment